Camp Nanowrimo 2013

In November 2012 I participated in my first National Novel Writing Month put on by NaNoWriMo .

It was thrilling to write 50,000 words in 30 days with thousands of other writers. The forums provided a feeling of being a part of a writing community that was very motivational. Watching the word count progress chart fill was also motivational. I won’t lie. Some days it was difficult to write 1667 words as a daily goal. But other days, especially weekends when I had more me time, the words flowed and I would surpass my daily goal. I highly recommend the experience if you’ve ever wondered if you could write a full novel. You’ll find out pretty quickly if your story can last through so many words. I loved it. I completed a first draft of a Young Adult Science Fiction novel, with working title of Left Behind (This working title will need to change as there is already a series with that name)

Nanowrimo also offers online camps in April and July (Camp Nanowrimo). In these camps, you’re placed in a cabin with your own chat panel. You can set your own goals starting at 10,000 words. Some people use the time to revise, research, or plan a next novel.

Camp-NaNoWriMo-2013-Winner-Lantern-Circle-Badge
I participated in both of these. In April I tried editing my November novel. It was much harder than I expected and I discovered that I needed to educate myself on character development, style, voice, pacing, and descriptions. Happily, I found that I had a good grasp of plot, pacing, and scenes. In July I wrote a second story that had been filling my head for a while. I now have two first drafts to play with and learn from: Left Behind, and Dragonstones. Finished first draft of Dragonstones. I will have to change the working title name as there are already many Dragon stones out there already.

As a winner, you receive many codes for discounts at websites that aid in the writing process. I received a discount on Scrivener, which I plan to use to organize my first drafts into chapters and scenes and fill in the missing pieces to make the story flow.

Follow Bonnie Jacoby on Facebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagram
Share on Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblr

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *